feminhistory:

Mary Seacole, photographed c.1867

Born in Jamaica in 1805, Mary Seacole was  the daughter of a freeborn Jamaican woman and a Scottish soldier in the British Army. Her mother was a well known healer in Kingston and taught Mary how to use traditional Caribbean and African herbal remedies from a young age.
After the outbreak of the Crimean War she applied to the War Office for the opportunity to nurse soldiers on the front lines but was refused. Undeterred and intent on helping she used her own resources to set up her own “British Hotel” for those injured on the battlefield. During her time there she saved countless lives with her herbal remedies to treat dysentery, infection and cholera and was hailed as a hero amongst service personnel. 
Whilst popular at the end of her life, after her death Seacole rapidly faded from public memory. Her work in Crimea was overshadowed by Florence Nightingale’s for many years. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in her achievements. Seacole has become a symbol of racial attitudes and social injustices during that period. She is often presented as an example of black history actively being hidden from popular culture.
“See, here is Mary Seacole, who did as much in the Crimea as another magic-lamping lady, but, being dark, could scarce be seen for the flame of Florence’s candle." - Salman Rushdie



She wrote a book—Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands—that is available for free download from manybooks.net, in a variety of formats.

feminhistory:

Mary Seacole, photographed c.1867

Born in Jamaica in 1805, Mary Seacole was  the daughter of a freeborn Jamaican woman and a Scottish soldier in the British Army. Her mother was a well known healer in Kingston and taught Mary how to use traditional Caribbean and African herbal remedies from a young age.

After the outbreak of the Crimean War she applied to the War Office for the opportunity to nurse soldiers on the front lines but was refused. Undeterred and intent on helping she used her own resources to set up her own “British Hotel” for those injured on the battlefield. During her time there she saved countless lives with her herbal remedies to treat dysentery, infection and cholera and was hailed as a hero amongst service personnel. 

Whilst popular at the end of her life, after her death Seacole rapidly faded from public memory. Her work in Crimea was overshadowed by Florence Nightingale’s for many years. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in her achievements. Seacole has become a symbol of racial attitudes and social injustices during that period. She is often presented as an example of black history actively being hidden from popular culture.

See, here is Mary Seacole, who did as much in the Crimea as another magic-lamping lady, but, being dark, could scarce be seen for the flame of Florence’s candle.- Salman Rushdie

She wrote a book—Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands—that is available for free download from manybooks.net, in a variety of formats.

(Reblogged from feminhistory)

thesmithian:

…series of images by NY photog Bing Wright who captured reflections of sunsets on shattered mirrors.

more.

(Reblogged from harrietsdaughter)

You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may trod me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I’ll rise.

Does my sassiness upset you?
Why are you beset with gloom?
‘Cause I walk like I’ve got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.

Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I’ll rise.

Did you want to see me broken?
Bowed head and lowered eyes?
Shoulders falling down like teardrops,
Weakened by my soulful cries?

Does my haughtiness offend you?
Don’t you take it awful hard
‘Cause I laugh like I’ve got gold mines
Diggin’ in my own backyard.

You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I’ll rise.

Does my sexiness upset you?
Does it come as a surprise
That I dance like I’ve got diamonds
At the meeting of my thighs?

Out of the huts of history’s shame
I rise
Up from a past that’s rooted in pain
I rise
I’m a black ocean, leaping and wide,
Welling and swelling I bear in the tide.

Leaving behind nights of terror and fear
I rise
Into a daybreak that’s wondrously clear
I rise
Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,
I am the dream and the hope of the slave.
I rise
I rise
I rise.

"Still I Rise" by Maya Angelou

Happy 86th Birthday, Queen!

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

(Source: thickthighsclubforgrrrls)

(Reblogged from knowledgeequalsblackpower)

medievalpoc:

Ancient Art Week!

Two-Headed Kantharos

Etruscan, late 6th Century B.C.E.

Museo nazionale di Villa Giulia, from Castellani Collection.

(Reblogged from medievalpoc)

omgrunlol:

powerlesbian:

today i learned domesticated talking birds that escape are teaching wild talking birds expletives that sometimes become that flock’s group call

can you imagine being out on a nature walk and randomly hearing a group of birds screaming HEY ASSHOLE

oh my god

(Source: auntiewitch)

(Reblogged from thefemaletyrant)

tolteka:

art by Ricardo Ortega (Mexican)

(Reblogged from poc-creators)

medievalpoc:

afro-textured-art:

spaceadmiraldee:

On April 30, Emory University will be offering a free online course on The Art and Archaeology of Ancient Nubia.

The class will reveal one of the most dynamic, yet little known cultures of the ancient world. It will explore the geography and archaeology of Nubia, Egypt’s neighbor to the south and home to a series of remarkable and innovative civilizations. It will cover the period from the earliest inhabitants of the Nile Valley (Paleolithic through Neolithic and domestication of plants and animals), and continue until the advent of Christianity.

The class is a combination of video lectures from five to 20 minutes in length with images of sites and objects along with maps and plans. There will also be some film clips as well. There will be homework-style quizzes to help students measure learning and explore the materials in more depth. There are several extra credit options, and there will be a final exam at the end of the course.

The course will last a total of 8 weeks and is taught in English with English subtitles. There will be a verified certificate of completion at the end of the course. Peter Lacovara, Senior Curator of Ancient Egyptian, Nubian, and Near Eastern Art at Michael C. Carlos Museum of Emory University will be teaching the class.

This is amazing!!! Hopefully there will a be lot artistic representation of ancient Nubians by the actual people instead of the ancient Egyptians. Maybe this can help me create an ancient Nubia page.

For Ancient Art Week and my Resources tag!!!

(Reblogged from medievalpoc)

lubiddu:

beefranck:

toolateadopter:

beefranck:

muffpunch:

todd-johnson:

what even are cats

Everything about this picture is the greatest thing I’ve ever seen.

I can’t stop laughing at this and I’m not even sure why.

"We have to talk about Jerry. I just don’t think he’s going to make the grade we’ve come to expect around here."

"CARL! CARL, YOU HAVE TO SEE THIS! THE SUN IS HIDING IN THIS LITTLE METAL HOUSE!"

"I rest my case."

"CARL! CARL! CARL!"

"Do. Something."

"CAAAAARRRRRRRRRLLLLLLLLL!"

"Or I will."

CRYING

OMFG the lamp. In my house, we call it the kitty heat lamp, since at any given time there is no room on the desk because the cats are sPrawled under the lamp.

(Reblogged from lubiddu)
The Negro artist works against an undertow of sharp criticism and misunderstanding from his own group and unintentional bribes from the whites. “Oh, be respectable, write about nice people, show how good we are,” say the Negroes. “Be stereotyped, don’t go too far, don’t shatter our illusions about you, don’t amuse us too seriously. We will pay you,” say the whites….An artist must be free to choose what he does, certainly, but he must also never be afraid to do what he must choose….We younger Negro artists who create now intend to express our individual dark-skinned selves without fear or shame. If white people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, it doesn’t matter. We know we are beautiful. And ugly too…. If colored people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, their displeasure doesn’t matter either. We build our temples for tomorrow, strong as we know how, and we stand on top of the mountain, free within ourselves.

Langston Hughes, The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain, 1926

(via zeram)

this was one of the first Black cultural theory text that i ever read and it still blows my mind. i am such a historian. love the classics.

(via wrcsolace)

(Reblogged from black-culture)
All of these stories make me who I am. But to insist on only these negative stories is to flatten my experience and to overlook the many other stories that formed me. The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.
Chimamanda Adichie (via oxblood)
(Reblogged from guerrillamamamedicine)