Showing posts tagged Astronomy

ikenbot:

Thor’s Helmet: Skywatcher Sees Glowing Gas Space Bubble

Astrophotographer Bill Snyder captured this spectacular view of massive cosmic cloud commonly known as Thor’s Helmet.

Snyder took the image in June 2011 from his home observatory in Connellsville, Penn., and recently provided. Multiple exposures are made to collect enough light for an image that would otherwise not be evident to the eye.

The emission nebula lies in Canis Major, about 15,000 light-years away from Earth. A light-year is the distance light travels in one year, or about 6 trillion miles (10 trillion kilometers).

Fierce stellar winds and intense radiation from a nearby star created the bubble-like shape of the nebula. This star, known as a Wolf-Rayet, is thought to be in a pre-supernova stage and likely has a mass 10 to 20 times that of the sun. The winds from this star create the shell of the glowing nebula. It has a blue-green hue due to the oxygen atoms in the gas.

(Reblogged from kenobi-wan-obi)

ikenbot:

Solar Loops

Image courtesy: SDO/NASA

Huge loops of plasma—superheated, charged gas—rise from an active region on the sun in a newly released picture from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. Each loop is as tall as several Earths stacked on top of each other.

(Reblogged from scinerds)
(Reblogged from kenobi-wan-obi)

cwnl:

Moon & Venus Over Switzerland

Sometimes a morning sky can be a combination of serene and surreal. Such a sky perhaps existed as viewed from a snowy slope in eastern Switzerland.

Quiet clouds blanket the above scene, lit from beneath by lights from the village of Trübbach.

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi)

(Reblogged from scinerds)

cwnl:

Fiery Moon

by Jerónimo Losada

Jerónimo Losada captured this amazing photo of the Moon from the roof of his house in Seville, Spain. He used a Canon EOS 60D camera and EF 75-300 lens at 300mm.

(Reblogged from kenobi-wan-obi)

cwnl:

Glorious Southern Comet

by David Malin

Comet McNaught 2006 P1, Chiro Observatory in Western Australia. Comet McNaught was the brightest comet in four decades.

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi)

(Reblogged from scinerds)

cwnl:

Crescent Moon & Mercury at Dawn

Copyright: Stefano De Rosa

(Reblogged from kenobi-wan-obi)
cwnl:

Truth Behind the Quote
Since I knew at some point people would remove the commentary (you know cause screw real sources!) from the image where I added it I decided to give it its own post here on my page so people can refer to it whenever they need to. I know somewhere down the line there’s going to be some shmuck that will end up removing the commentary on this post as well, so I would love it if followers who are aware of this to keep the torch going and at the very least kindly inform those who misquote this wonderful piece of literature of who the credit actually belongs to.
I cringe every time I see this quote along with Galileo’s name or picture accompanied by it with a gajillion notes.
As much as I love Galileo and the work he did put out, these are not his words. This line is an excerpt from “The Old Astronomer”, or “The Old Astronomer to His Pupil” written solely by poet Sarah Williams (1837–1868).
I love poems as much as the next person, even more so when it expresses the night and stars so creatively, but there’s already enough wrongfully cited publishing done by women attributed to the men of history.. Let’s at the very least give her credit for what she did and quit dedicating artwork, doodles, T-shirts, paintings towards the wrong person.

cwnl:

Truth Behind the Quote

Since I knew at some point people would remove the commentary (you know cause screw real sources!) from the image where I added it I decided to give it its own post here on my page so people can refer to it whenever they need to. I know somewhere down the line there’s going to be some shmuck that will end up removing the commentary on this post as well, so I would love it if followers who are aware of this to keep the torch going and at the very least kindly inform those who misquote this wonderful piece of literature of who the credit actually belongs to.

I cringe every time I see this quote along with Galileo’s name or picture accompanied by it with a gajillion notes.

As much as I love Galileo and the work he did put out, these are not his words. This line is an excerpt from “The Old Astronomer”, or “The Old Astronomer to His Pupil” written solely by poet Sarah Williams (1837–1868).

I love poems as much as the next person, even more so when it expresses the night and stars so creatively, but there’s already enough wrongfully cited publishing done by women attributed to the men of history.. Let’s at the very least give her credit for what she did and quit dedicating artwork, doodles, T-shirts, paintings towards the wrong person.

(Reblogged from kenobi-wan-obi)