Showing posts tagged Vintage
vintageblackglamour:

Richard Theodore Greener (1844-1922) was the first Black graduate of Harvard University (Class of 1870). His papers, including his Harvard diploma, his law license, photos and papers connected to his diplomatic role in Russia and his friendship with President Ulysses S. Grant, were recently discovered in an attic on the South Side of Chicago - just before the house was demolished. Absolutely MONUMENTAL!

vintageblackglamour:

Richard Theodore Greener (1844-1922) was the first Black graduate of Harvard University (Class of 1870). His papers, including his Harvard diploma, his law license, photos and papers connected to his diplomatic role in Russia and his friendship with President Ulysses S. Grant, were recently discovered in an attic on the South Side of Chicago - just before the house was demolished. Absolutely MONUMENTAL!

(Reblogged from vintageblackglamour)
(Reblogged from dreams-from-my-father)

burnedshoes:

© Charles “Teenie” Harris, 1930s-1940s, One Shot Teenie

#1: Two young women eating caramel apples, 1940-1945
#2: A woman outside Kay’s Valet Shoppe, 1938-1945
#3: Boys (possibly from Herron Hill School) playing brass instruments, 1938-1945
#4: A woman poses with a car on Mulford Street in Homewood, 1937

In the days of film, especially in a controlled setting, photographers often made redundant shots to make sure they captured what they wanted. Not Charles “Teenie” Harris. A native of Pittsburgh’s Hill District, the city’s cultural center of African-American life, Harris was a semi-pro athlete and a numbers runner before he bought his first camera in the 1930s. He opened a photography studio and specialized in glamour portraits, earning the nickname “One Shot” because he rarely made his subjects sit for a second take. (read more)

Nearly 80 years later, a retrospective of the photographer’s work, Teenie Harris, Photographer: An American Storyis on view at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh until April 7, 2012.

» find more exhibitions here «

(Reblogged from burnedshoes)

kilele:

Portrait of a lady from Zanzibar

Description reads: “Nature of a swahily in a laughing manner”

This image is part of the Colonial Office photographic collection held at The National Archives, uploaded as part of the Africa Through a Lens project.

What style and class, this woman. One of those people who seem to be born models. I wish I could see the colors of that amazing outfit, too…

(Reblogged from kilele)
(Reblogged from backtothefiveanddime)

amamblog:

Today we honor the memory of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In this photo, taken by Ernest Withers, King is confronted at the funeral of Medgar Evers, a civil rights activist and World War II veteran assassinated in June 1963. 

Ernest Withers was an African-American photojournalist who was born and worked in Memphis. He documented the Civil Rights Movement from the 1950s through the 1960s. His self-published pamphlet of photographs on the Emmit Till murder helped spur the equal rights movement.

Withers described his first-hand involvement with the movement: “I’ve never been so scared in my life as I was in some of those places. You’d go into town with one of those big four-by-five press cameras…you couldn’t hide it anyplace. That camera was the first thing people would go for.”

Withers forged a close personal relationship with King, Evers, and James Meredith. His visual records of events like the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott and King’s assassination were often the first - and sometimes the only - photographs to document these events as they unfolded. Often this happened before the national press took up the stories. Withers reminds us that in the 1950s and early 1960s, the black papers were not part of the national wire services.


Image:
Ernest C. Withers (American, 1922–2007)
Dr. Martin Luther King Is Confronted: Dr. King is stopped by police at Medgar Evers’ funeral, Jackson, Mississippi, June 1963
From the portfolio I am a Man, 1963
Gelatin silver print
Oberlin Friends of Art Fund
AMAM 2004.6.6
 

(Reblogged from black-culture)

foto-jennic:

Tintype circa 1884 of a woman from the Sloman-Bell in Ontario; her relatives were former slaves who escaped the US & settled in Canada. 

Rick Bell Family — Brock University Archives, Brock University

Source

She’s beautiful. At least one, perhaps two, of my great-great (maybe one more great) uncles escaped slavery by fleeing into Canada (one on his 13th attempt). And then disappeared. At least I’ve not found record of them anywhere yet, but will keep looking.

(Reblogged from knowledgeequalsblackpower)

vintageblackbeauty:

Vrouwen. Een Bundu meisje uit Sierra Leone Centraal Afrika na een rituele wassing in inheemse feestkledij. Tot aan het moment dat zij ‘vrouw’ wordt, mag zij geen katoenen doeken over haar lichaam dragen. Foto 1925.

Women. A Bundu girl from Sierra Leone.


1925. Dang. I think whoever “invented” the bikini might owe some folks some royalties…

(Reblogged from thefemaletyrant)

hollyhocksandtulips:

Sophia Loren

Publicity photo for “Heller in Pink Tights,” 1960

(Reblogged from hollyhocksandtulips)
kvetchlandia:

Uncredited Photographer     Unnamed Lakota Woman     c.1890

kvetchlandia:

Uncredited Photographer     Unnamed Lakota Woman     c.1890

(Reblogged from kvetchlandia)