Showing posts tagged africa

fuckyeahafricanmythology:

(Art by Allswansarewhite)

Wokulo

Troll/Dwarf

Forest 

Mali

Troublesome

 The Wokulo are 3ft tall Dwarves who are vary hairy and have large heads and very annoying. However to most, the Wokulo are invisible and tend to steal food. They have a keen sense of alertness, are strong enough to defeat powerful wrestlers in a fight and are difficult to track. They also have the unique ability to see through walls and trees.
(Reblogged from fuckyeahafricanmythology)
souls-of-my-shoes:

favoritesss

souls-of-my-shoes:

favoritesss

(Reblogged from souls-of-my-shoes)

Introducing Bino and Fino, Africa’s answer to Dora the Explorer

stopwhitewashing:

(CNN) — Move over Disney — a Nigerian animator has produced an educational cartoon to teach youngsters about African culture.

Tired of African children watching only imported cartoons that didn’t reflect their lives, Nigerian animator Adamu Waziri decided to do something about it.

His creation is “Bino and Fino,” a cartoon aimed at three to five year olds, about a brother and sister who live with their grandparents in an unnamed African city.

“I want to create a brand that’s as good as Dora the Explorer, Charlie and Lola, quality wise, made in Nigeria, that is educational, and also shows positive aspects of Nigerian/African culture, not just to Nigerian or African kids but to kids everywhere,” says Waziri.

The pilot episode celebrated Nigeria’s Independence Day and looked at the issue of colonialism. The cartoon has also had segments teaching the numbers one to 10 in the Nigerian Igbo and Yoruba languages.

He adds that he wants the program to “teach kids and show that the stuff you see on TV of starving people isn’t the only thing (in Africa) — you have a middle class here who have the same aspirations as everybody else.”

See also: Meet the Afropolitans

Bino and Fino isn’t the only children’s cartoon produced in Africa. “Tinga Tinga Tales,” for example, is made in Kenya for the BBC, while “Jungle Beat” is produced in South Africa and has been shown internationally. But both cartoons, like many set in Africa, tell stories about the continent’s exotic animals. Waziri was determined to do something different.

“I said I’m not going do African folk tales, animals — that’s what you get in (animated movie) ‘Madagascar’ — we don’t want to do that,” he says.

“We want to show a couple of kids in a middle class life, which I know isn’t the reality of all the kids in Africa, but let’s show that reality — the reality of people using laptops, phones, going to school, doing their daily business — no talking ants, no dancing ‘jinga jinga’ music — just a cartoon of life.”

Two full-length “Bino and Fino” episodes have been shown on a channel on Sky TV in the UK, where Waziri says it has been well received. The next step is to attract the funding and sponsors needed to get the cartoon aired in Nigeria.

See also: Nigerian blockbusters for internet generation

It takes Waziri and his core team of four a month and a half to produce a single episode of Bino and Fino, which is just eight minutes of animation. His says the slow turnaround is off-putting for sponsors in Nigeria, where feature-length Nollywood movies are often produced in a matter of weeks.

Waziri adds that when it comes to entertainment, some Nigerians have a mindset of “West is best,” but he is determined to change people’s minds by showing it’s possible to make a credible homegrown alternative to imported programs.

He believes that it’s not enough for Africans to complain of being underrepresented in foreign cartoons, or misrepresented by international media — they must also do something about it.

“People complain that Africa is not represented well in the media,” says Waziri. “I understand that, but my point is Nigeria and other parts of Africa aren’t poor, you have businessmen, the infrastructure, the ability to link up and make studios, finance it and sponsor it and make the market — stop waiting for Disney to do it, do it yourself.”

(Reblogged from thefemaletyrant)

fyeahblackhistory:

Cetshwayo kaMpande (1826– 8 February 1884)

The picture is painting of Cetshwayo kaMpande who was the king of the Zulu nation from 1872 to 1879

Cetshwayo kaMpande was the last king of an independent Zulu nation. He faced the British in the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879. During which the battle of Isandlwana occurred and proved to be the worst defeat ever suffered by British forces against native opposition.
The battle was the first major encounter in the Anglo-Zulu War between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom.  
The British lodss of the battle at Isandlwana stunned the world. It was unthinkable that a “native” army armed substantially with stabbing weapons could defeat the troops of a western power armed with modern rifles and artillery, let alone wipe it out.

Until news of the disaster reached Britain the Zulu War was just another colonial brushfire war of the sort that simmered constantly in many parts of the worldwide British Empire. The complete loss of a battalion of troops, news of which was sent by telegraph to Britain, transformed the nation’s attitude to the war.

Aftermath

In the longer term the British Government determined to avenge the defeat and overwhelming reinforcements were dispatched to Natal. General Sir Garnet Wolseley was sent to replace Lord Chelmsford, arriving after the final battle of the war. Cetshwayo’s overwhelming success at Isandlwana secured his ultimate downfall.

Cetshwayo was sent in exile to Cape Town when his forces were ultimately defeated. He was restored after appealing to Queen Victoria, but was forced to flee in the face of civil war. His death shortly after may have been the result of poisoning.

(Reblogged from diasporicroots)

theotherblack:

Photog Vivianne Sassen

(Reblogged from theotherblack)

sabisierraleone:

York Beach..

Looks like there is mischief afoot.

(Reblogged from souls-of-my-shoes)

kilele:

Portrait of a lady from Zanzibar

Description reads: “Nature of a swahily in a laughing manner”

This image is part of the Colonial Office photographic collection held at The National Archives, uploaded as part of the Africa Through a Lens project.

What style and class, this woman. One of those people who seem to be born models. I wish I could see the colors of that amazing outfit, too…

(Reblogged from kilele)

dynamicafrica:

Afrikan Alphabets Book by Saki Mafundikwa

Afrikan Alphabets – The story of writing in Afrika is a book written by Zimbabwe designer Saki Mafundikwa.

Afrikan alphabets have a rich cultural and artistic history. Many continue to be in current use today. Their story, however, is little known due largely to their past suppression by colonial powers. This book sets the record straight. Both entertaining and anecdotal, African Alphabets presents a wealth of highly graphical and attractive illustrations.

Writing systems across the Afrikan continent and the Diaspora are included, analyzed and illustrated: the scripts of the West Africans – Mende, Vai, Nsibidi, Bamum and the Somali, and Ethiopian scripts. Other alphabets, syllabaries, paintings, pictographs, ideographs, and symbols are compared and contrasted.” 

(Reblogged from )
excentricyoruba:

jakigriot:

Where is this mask from? 
Okay, Internet! Help me please! I found this in the thrift store. It is beautiful and obviously handcrafted. It seems old and the beading is pretty intricate. I would love to know where it’s from and learn more about it’s culture. If it is something that needs to be somewhere specific (I dunno, like a graveyard or a church or where ever), I have no problem finding a good home for it. But it seems too beautiful to let sit there in the thrift store gathering dust. And if it wouldn’t be disrespectful, I’m more than willing to give it a place in my home.
Can you help me? Any ideas? Reblog if you can. Email me for more photos. When/if I find out, I’ll let everyone know.

Took me a while to crosscheck but this mask is most likely from the Luba people of the Democratic Republic of Congo. When I reblogged this earlier, I guessed the mask was from Central Africa but was not sure. I have taken photos of masks, statues and dolls from mostly West and Central Africa as a hobby. I’m in no way an expert.
After a quick search online, I found Luba masks that look very similar to this one (see here for example, also here). These masks, known as kifwebe seem to be largely ceremonial and associated with a secret society the Bwadi Bwa Kifwebe. You read more about the Luba here, here, and on Wiki. There’s also a documentary, ‘African Art, Women, History: The Luba People of Central Africa’ that looks interesting if you can get a copy of it.

excentricyoruba:

jakigriot:

Where is this mask from?

Okay, Internet! Help me please! I found this in the thrift store. It is beautiful and obviously handcrafted. It seems old and the beading is pretty intricate. I would love to know where it’s from and learn more about it’s culture. If it is something that needs to be somewhere specific (I dunno, like a graveyard or a church or where ever), I have no problem finding a good home for it. But it seems too beautiful to let sit there in the thrift store gathering dust. And if it wouldn’t be disrespectful, I’m more than willing to give it a place in my home.

Can you help me? Any ideas? Reblog if you can. Email me for more photos. When/if I find out, I’ll let everyone know.

Took me a while to crosscheck but this mask is most likely from the Luba people of the Democratic Republic of Congo. When I reblogged this earlier, I guessed the mask was from Central Africa but was not sure. I have taken photos of masks, statues and dolls from mostly West and Central Africa as a hobby. I’m in no way an expert.

After a quick search online, I found Luba masks that look very similar to this one (see here for example, also here). These masks, known as kifwebe seem to be largely ceremonial and associated with a secret society the Bwadi Bwa Kifwebe. You read more about the Luba here, here, and on Wiki. There’s also a documentary, ‘African Art, Women, History: The Luba People of Central Africa’ that looks interesting if you can get a copy of it.

(Source: jakigriot)

(Reblogged from thefemaletyrant)

dynamicafrica:

New Music Video: 2Face - Raindrops

The wait is over for the video of the award winning song ”Raindrops” from the album ”Unstoppable” by 2Face Idibia, this classy video was shot in Ghana and directed by Isaac Offei Awuah for Hypertek Entertainment.

(Reblogged from )