Showing posts tagged medicine
historical-nonfiction:

The Ebers papyrus (1350 B.C.) suggests placing drops of crushed and roasted ox liver in the eyes of people suffering from night blindness. While Egyptians most likely were not aware of vitamin A, liver does have high levels of the vitamin which help maintains normal vision in dim light.

historical-nonfiction:

The Ebers papyrus (1350 B.C.) suggests placing drops of crushed and roasted ox liver in the eyes of people suffering from night blindness. While Egyptians most likely were not aware of vitamin A, liver does have high levels of the vitamin which help maintains normal vision in dim light.

(Reblogged from historical-nonfiction)
mothernaturenetwork:

Mexican researchers patent heroin vaccineThe vaccine is intended for ‘serious addicts’ who have had little success with other treatments.

mothernaturenetwork:

Mexican researchers patent heroin vaccine
The vaccine is intended for ‘serious addicts’ who have had little success with other treatments.

(Reblogged from mothernaturenetwork)
longreads:

In the 1940s, U.S. doctors led experiments that intentionally infected thousands of Guatemalans with venereal diseases. A closer look at how it happened, and who knew:

John Cutler, the young investigator who led the Guatemalan experiments, had the full backing of US health officials, including the surgeon general. “Cutler thought that what he was doing was really important, and he wasn’t some lone gunman,” says Susan Reverby, a historian at Wellesley College in Massachusetts, whose discovery of Cutler’s unpublished reports on the experiments led to the public disclosure of the research.

“Human Experiments: First, Do Harm.” — Matthew Walter, Nature
See also: “A Deadly Misdiagnosis: Is it Possible to Save the Millions of People who Die from TB?” — Michael Specter, The New Yorker, Nov. 8. 2010

longreads:

In the 1940s, U.S. doctors led experiments that intentionally infected thousands of Guatemalans with venereal diseases. A closer look at how it happened, and who knew:

John Cutler, the young investigator who led the Guatemalan experiments, had the full backing of US health officials, including the surgeon general. “Cutler thought that what he was doing was really important, and he wasn’t some lone gunman,” says Susan Reverby, a historian at Wellesley College in Massachusetts, whose discovery of Cutler’s unpublished reports on the experiments led to the public disclosure of the research.

“Human Experiments: First, Do Harm.” — Matthew Walter, Nature

See also: “A Deadly Misdiagnosis: Is it Possible to Save the Millions of People who Die from TB?” — Michael Specter, The New Yorker, Nov. 8. 2010

(Reblogged from knowledgeequalsblackpower)

First ‘Heartless’ Man: You don’t really need a Heart, or a Pulse

ziyadmd:

Two doctors Billy Cohn and Bud Frazier from the Texas Heart Institute successfully replaced a dying man’s heart with a device — proving that it is possible for your body to be kept alive without a heart, or a pulse. 

In the short film ‘Heart Stop Beating’ by Jeremiah Zagar of Focus Forward Films, Zagar documents the process of the doctors — from cutting out the whole heart of 50 calves and replacing it with centrifugal pumps, to finally implanting it into their patient Craig Lewis. The turbine-like device, that are simple whirling rotors, developed by the doctors does not beat like a heart, rather provides a ‘continuous flow’ like a garden hose.  

Craig Lewis was a 55-year-old, dying from amyloidosis — which causes a build-up of abnormal proteins. These proteins clog the organs so much that they stop working. But after the operation, with the ‘machine’ as his heart’s replacement, Lewis’ blood continued to spin and move through his body. 

However, when doctors put a stethoscope to his chest, you wouldn’t hear a heartbeat (just a ‘humming’ sound). If you examined his arteries, there’s no pulse. If you hooked him up to an EKG, he’d be flat-lined — which by all criteria that we conventionally use to analyze patients, he is dead. This is proof that human physiology can be supported without a pulse

Check out the short video below to see it all:

This is really cool—though one is, of course, tempted to make jokes about the Tin Man, or better yet, vampires.

(Reblogged from ziyadnazem)